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Mar 162014
 

An artist's illustration of an 880-lb. (400 kg.) space rock just before it slammed into the moon on Sept. 11, 2013 to create the brightest lunar impact flash ever seen. The meteorite impact carved a crater in the lunar surface 131 feet (40 meters) wide. Credit: J. Madiedo / MIDAS / Universidad de Huelva

An artist’s illustration of an 880-lb. (400 kg.) space rock just before it slammed into the moon on Sept. 11, 2013 to create the brightest lunar impact flash ever seen. The meteorite impact carved a crater in the lunar surface 131 feet (40 meters) wide.
Credit: J. Madiedo / MIDAS / Universidad de Huelva

This month’s full moon — which officially turns full at 1:08 p.m. EDT  Sunday. We will see it rise at 06:08:24 p.m.

This one is called the “Full Worm Moon.” The name comes from the appearance of earthworms as the ground softens after winter thaws.

Interesting NOTE and WEB Event

On Sept. 11, 2013, a space rock slammed into the moon traveling at an estimated 37,900 mph (61,000 km/h). This record-breaking impact triggered the brightest lunar explosion ever witnessed.

The online Slooh community telescope website will use the full moon event to examine the impact site in the Mare Nubium lunar basin.

 

You can watch the moon webcast live on the Slooh website, as well as on Space.com beginning at 9 p.m. EDT tonight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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