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Mar 312019
 

Edmund Tucker, 96, passed away in Manchester, New Hampshire on March 25.

He was born in Wolfeville, NS, Canada to Herbert and Leota Tucker.

While a small child, his family lived in East Granby, Connecticut, West Newbury, Mass. and Mount Pleasant, Iowa. In 1930, they moved to Sackville, NB where he attended school including Mount Allison University. He obtained both chemistry and physics degrees from MTA. In the Spring of 1944, he enrolled in the Canadian Navy.

After joining the Navy, he was transferred to Plymouth, England where he was on loan to the British Navy for training. His selection for the next assignment allowed him to travel around the world as the Radar officer of the ship.

After the war, in an all Canada competition, he won a Rhodes Scholarship and attended Oxford University, eventually getting a Master’s degree in Physics.

Just before traveling to England for the Rhodes scholarship, he married his wife Noreen. He returned to Sackville in 1948. The Tuckers came to the US in 1948 shortly after their son was born in Sackville. Ed and Noreen had three children. His daughters live in NH and his son in Ohio.

Dr. Tucker had a distinguished career. He graduated from Yale with a Ph.D. in Physics and went on to a postdoc at the University of Minnesota. Disenchanted by big classes he joined the General Electric research lab where he became an expert in the field of Solid State Masers. In 1968, his book “Solid State Masers” was published in the UK and the US.

In the late 1960s after a time as personnel manager for the GE Research Laboratory, he transitioned to the General Electric Foundation for Educational Research and began visiting Universities across the country to assess their research programs to see if they were deserving of funding from GE to further develop their programs. This transition caused a move from New York to Connecticut.

After nearly 16 years in Educational Research, he retired at 62 to enjoy sailing on Long Island Sound and gardening with his wife. He was involved with the Land Trust in Orange from its inception and also the Wet Lands Commission, Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce of Orange, CT.

In 2001, a park, Tucker’s Ridge, was named in his honor for him having served for such a long time and having such a positive influence on the preservation of parcels of land for open space within Orange.
He lived in Orange from 1972 until 2015 when he moved to NH. His wife Noreen died in 2010, leaving him alone in their long-term home. In NH, he resided at Birch Hill Terrace in Manchester nearer to his daughters.

A memorial celebration will take place at the Orange Congregational Church on Saturday, April 13 at 11 a.m. with an additional celebration at Tucker’s Ridge at 3 p.m.

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