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Here’s Your Opportunity To Get The Answers You’ve Been Seeking

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May 202018
 

 

ORANGE LAND TRUST ANNUAL MEETING: Nuisance Wildlife! Problems and Solutions
The Orange Land Trust welcomes everyone to its Annual Meeting, on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, at High Plains Community Center, 525 Orange Center Road, at 7 pm.
Following a short business meeting, the program for the evening features a visit from Chris Vann, a nuisance wildlife biologist who just may have the answers to “critter issues” you may be struggling with around your home and property.

A fox, with a small animal in its mouth photographed on Derby Milford Road. (submitted photo)

Chris is a nuisance wildlife biologist with the CT DEEP Technical Assistance Program, Wildlife Division. This presentation on common wildlife, problems, and solutions, will provide an interesting and informative look at what you need to know and what measures you can take yourself. You will learn about squirrels, raccoons, foxes, coyotes, deer, and other wildlife that can become a problem when they take up residence in, or just visit, populated areas.

There are many other wildlife species that may cause conflicts, but for homeowners, these species are among those most frequently complained about.
He also discusses raccoon and bat rabies and rabies response guidelines. As the Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator (NWCO) Program Biologist he will provide info on this thirty-year-old program and its operation.
All animals require our respect. We will learn the basic precautions that could be taken to avoid or minimize what could possibly become a dangerous or tragic situation.
The Land Trust is anticipating an informative and educational evening for everyone. Plan to join them.
This program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.
Remember, the Orange Land Trust is always looking for new members and volunteers. For more information visit orangectlandtrust.org or call 203-799-7622.

Country Fair: Orange Land Trust Presents North American Birds Of Prey

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Aug 082017
 

Photo Credit: ©2012 Alex Iannelli

North American Birds of Prey: from the smallest to some of the largest.

The Orange Land Trust has invited WINGMASTERS’ Julie Collier to present another of her captivating Birds of Prey programs at the Orange Country Fair on Saturday and Sunday, September 16 and 17. This presentation, featuring live raptors, from the adorable Saw-whet Owl to some of the largest, will center around the birds found in our region of eastern North America.

Birds of prey, also known as raptors, are hunting birds characterized by hooked beaks and powerful grabbing feet armed with sharp talons (the word raptor comes from a Latin word that means “to seize”). Raptors also boast the best eyesight and the sharpest hearing in the animal kingdom. Raptors include eagles, hawks, falcons, and owls, and this presentation gives an overview of these different categories. We will gain an understanding of predation, the birds’ place at the top of the food web, their different hunting adaptations and their status in a rapidly changing world. Because many birds of prey are declining in number, this presentation also features one or more endangered raptors and explains why these species face an uncertain future.

WINGMASTERS is dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of North American birds of prey. Julie Anne Collier and Jim Parks are both licensed raptor rehabilitators based in Massachusetts. Together they care for injured birds of prey with the goal of ultimately releasing them back into the wild. In cases where the birds are left permanently handicapped, Julie and Jim are further licensed to provide a home for these non-releasable raptors and to use them for educational programs.

The Orange Country Fair is held at the Fairgrounds on Orange Center Road. Each day there will be four half-hour presentations on the hour – at 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1 p.m., and 2 p.m.    

Collier has been our guest at the Fair for several years. “One of the reasons I like working with Land Trusts is that the biggest problem with these birds is the loss of habitat, and Land Trusts work to preserve open space much needed by so many birds.” She is concerned about the fragmentation of forests and destruction of remaining open space areas by development.

The citizens of the Town of Orange have done much to provide excellent habitat for a wide variety of birds and other wildlife through the preservation of natural open space. This includes the former Hubble property now known as the Turkey Hill Preserve. This, along with other areas, is managed by the Orange Conservation Commission or the Orange Land Trust for protection, preservation, and passive use.

As usual, the Orange Land Trust will have its own tent. Stop by to view the free programs, get information on walking and hiking areas in the Town of Orange, and see the photography display.  There will be pen and ink note cards designed and drawn by Michael O’Bymachow, and tee-shirts featuring a bird of prey drawn by Julie Collier. Proceeds will benefit the OLT.

Collier will have for sale suitable-for-framing art prints of the birds. These sales will benefit her Educational Raptor Center and her special work with endangered species and preparing them for release into the wild.     

The Orange Land Trust is a private non-profit, volunteer organization, supported by its membership, that is dedicated to acquiring and preserving natural resources and open space in the Town of Orange. New members are always welcome. Membership registration forms will be available at the tent!

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Orange Land Trust Plans Guided Hike Of Housatonic Overlook

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Apr 092016
 

march-2211The Orange Land Trust will be leading a guided walk at the Housatonic Overlook area on Saturday, April 9th. Participants should meet at 9:30 a.m. at the end of High Ridge Road (off of Derby-Milford Road). The walk is expected to take about two hours.

This event will include a viewing of the Housatonic River, looking up and down the valley from atop Tucker’s Ridge, which is about 200 feet above the river, and a walk through the easy to moderately difficult trails in this area. We will learn some interesting information about the Housatonic, one of Connecticut’s three major rivers that reach Long Island Sound, and yes, it is true, Orange has a coastline!

The hike will take us through a beautiful rocky, wooded landscape, typical of areas on “higher ground” around Connecticut. Many of the trails are lined by Connecticut’s state flower – the Mountain Laurel. It will be too early to see the Mountain Laurel in bloom, but it is the right season to catch sight of a bald eagle soaring above the river. Compact binoculars will help in this and always add to the enjoyment of the outdoors.

The Land Trust will be joined by the Orange CERT Emergency Communications Team. They will serve as trail assistants, while they get to know the area terrain and perform a simulated search and rescue communications exercise, such as would be needed to find and escort lost hikers out to safety.

Wear appropriate footwear as there are some rocky areas and some “ups and downs” in the trail. We recommend hiking boots/shoes or shoes/sneakers with a good tread. A hiking stick or trekking pole(s) can be helpful.

This unique hike is free, not difficult, and always a pleasure. All are welcome, please plan to join us and bring a friend. Only steady rain showers or severe weather will cancel. Please park along the end of road.

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Country Fair — North American Birds of Prey: from the smallest to some of the largest

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Sep 082015
 

­

©2012 Alex Iannelli

©2012 Alex Iannelli

The Orange Land Trust has invited WINGMASTERS’ Julie Collier to present another of her captivating Birds of Prey programs at the Orange Country Fair on Saturday and Sunday, September 19th. and 20th. This presentation, featuring live raptors, from the adorable Saw-whet Owl to the some of the largest, centers around the birds found in our region of eastern North America.

Birds of prey, also known as raptors, are hunting birds characterized by hooked beaks and powerful grabbing feet armed with sharp talons (the word raptor comes from a Latin word that means “to seize”). Raptors also boast the best eyesight and the sharpest hearing in the animal kingdom.

Raptors include eagles, hawks, falcons and owls, and this presentation, gives an overview of these different categories. We will gain an understanding of predation, the birds’ place at the top of the food web, their different hunting adaptations and their status in a rapidly changing world. Because many birds of prey are declining in number, this presentation also features one or more endangered raptors, and explains why these species face an uncertain future.

WINGMASTERS is dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of North American birds of prey. Julie Anne Collier and Jim Parks are both licensed raptor rehabilitators based in Massachusetts. Together they care for injured birds of prey with the goal of ultimately releasing them back into the wild. In cases where the birds are left permanently handicapped, Julie and Jim are further licensed to provide a home for these non-releasable raptors, and to use them for educational programs.

The Orange Country Fair is held at the Fairgrounds on Orange Center Road. Each day there will be four half-hour presentations on the hour – at 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1 p.m., and 2 p.m.    

Collier has been our guest at the Fair for several years. “One of the reasons I like working with Land Trusts is that the biggest problem to these birds is loss of habitat, and Land Trusts work to preserve open space much needed by so many birds.” She is concerned about the fragmentation of forests and destruction of remaining open space areas by development.

The citizens of the Town of Orange have done much to provide excellent habitat for a wide variety of birds and other wildlife through the preservation of natural open space, including the former Hubble property now known as the Turkey Hill Preserve, along with other areas managed by the Orange Land Trust and the Orange Conservation Commission for protection, preservation and passive use.

As usual, the Orange Land Trust will have its own tent. Stop by to view the free programs, get information on walking and hiking areas in the Town of Orange, and see the photography display.  There will be pen and ink note cards designed and drawn by Michael O’Bymachow, and tee-shirts featuring a bird of prey drawn by Julie Collier. Proceeds will benefit the OLT. 

Collier will have for sale suitable-for-framing art prints of the birds. These sales will benefit her Educational Raptor Center and her special work with endangered species and preparing them for release into the wild.     

The Orange Land Trust is a private nonprofit, volunteer organization that is dedicated to preserving natural resources and open space in the Town of Orange. New members are always welcome. Membership registration forms will be available at the tent!

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Photo Credit: ©2012 Alex Iannelli

_______________________________________________________________________________________

You may contact me at: Chris Shaw, Orange Land Trust, Publicity

phone: 203.397.7599 or email: cshaw@snet.net with OLT Orange Country Fair in subject line

Orange Land Trust Cries “WOLF!”

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May 172015
 

Atka, the Wolf Conservation Center’s Arctic Gray Wolf will be the special guest at The Orange Land Trust's Annual Meeting May 28.

Atka, the Wolf Conservation Center’s Arctic Gray Wolf will be the special guest at The Orange Land Trust’s Annual Meeting May 28.

The Orange Land Trust would like to invite you to its Annual Meeting at High Plains Community Center Thursday, May 28 at 7 p.m.

Following a short business meeting, the Orange Land Trust hosts a visit from Atka, the Wolf Conservation Center’s Arctic Gray Wolf.

The program will include an awe-inspiring, up-close encounter with this important, but misunderstood predator. Guests will learn about the history of wolves in the United States, the importance of wolves in a healthy ecosystem and the efforts to save these magnificent creatures for future generations. 

Through wolves, the WCC teaches the broader message of conservation, ecological balance, and personal responsibility for improved human stewardship of our world.  By providing science-based information, the WCC allows wolves and humans to better coexist in our fragile environment, improves our efforts to successfully restore endangered wolves to their ancestral homes in the wild and offers direct exposure to an elusive predator people might not ever see in the wild.

 Founded in 1999 the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) in South Salem, NY promotes wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment and the human role in protecting their future. The WCC accomplishes this mission through onsite and offsite education programs. These programs emphasize wolf biology, the ecological benefits of wolves and other large predators, and the current status of wolf recovery in the United States.

The WCC also participates in the Species Survival Plan (SSP) and Recovery Plan for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf and the red wolf. For more information about the WCC visit the website at www.nywolf.org or call (914) 763-2373.

For information about The Orange Land Trust, visit our website at www.orangectlandtrust.org

This program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Early Orange History and Present-Day Natural Beauty, all in a Saturday Morning

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Nov 072014
 

IMG_0560The Orange Land Trust will be leading a guided hike at the Howard Brooks’ Wepawaug Conservation area on Saturday, Nov. 8. Participants should meet at 9:30 a.m. at the parking lot on Mapledale Road (across from Cherry Hill Road). GPS location coordinates in decimal degrees: 41.2943 / 73.0302.

This moderate to challenging hike will include information on the historical highlights of the area, a view of an old mill foundation and flume cut through solid rock, and a walk through the Wepawaug Ravine. The area has great beauty, that is very visible at this time of year with the reduced foliage, and a rich history of early Orange water-powered industry. Here, we can still see the remains of a mill that, at one time, made fabric for union soldiers’ uniforms during the Civil War.

If you have visited the grist-mill and saw-mill at Sturbridge, Massachusetts, you can easily imagine how this area looked with several mills in operation along the river, from the early settlement days of the seventeenth century to the turn of the twentieth. Interestingly, the Alling Tavern, where the mill workers often ate their meals, is still standing across Route 34 at Mapledale Road. Can you think of the aroma of fresh baked, wholegrain bread and beef stew at lunchtime on a gray and chilly autumn afternoon? What a welcome for travelers arriving and those workers as they crossed the Derby Turnpike toll road and approached the door ready for a mid-day meal.

Now, with the leaves mostly fallen, we can see more of the landscape within the area, and we hope, with the rainier weather of fall, the natural rock-walled ravine should be a sight to be seen with plenty of water flowing through. 

In addition, we will look over the remains of a 20 foot stone chimney and learn the folksy story of a depression-era structure known as “Jim Neal’s cabin.”

Please wear appropriate footwear as there are some rocky areas and some “ups and downs” in the trail. We recommend hiking boots/shoes or shoes/sneakers with a good tread. A good hiking stick or trekking pole(s) can be helpful. 

This free hike, conducted by volunteers of the Orange Land Trust, is not difficult for those who are sure-footed and presents an opportunity to reconnect with our town’s history and beauty. All are welcome and please bring a friend. 

So, bake some bread, get the ingredients for your favorite stew simmering in the crock-pot for when you return home, and plan to join us! Only steady rain showers will cancel.

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Originally Published on: Oct 22, 2014 @ 12:22

Orange Land Trust Offers Hike Through The Turkey Hill Preserve

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Jun 052014
 

Turkey Hill Preserve

OLT photo courtesy of Karen Schnitzer

From the Orange Land Trust:

The Orange Land Trust will host a guided hike of the Turkey Hill Preserve on Saturday, June 21.

Meet in the parking lot at 300 Derby Milford Road (GPS address), opposite Turkey Hill Road at 9:30 a.m.

Orange’s largest open space site offers 376 acres of old growth forest, ledges, ridges, vernal pools, gorges, streams, ponds, shallow waterways, and a wide variety of plants and wildlife.

This is a moderate to challenging hike, so please wear appropriate footwear as there are some rocky areas and some “ups and downs” in the trail. We recommend hiking boots/shoes or shoes/sneakers with a good tread. A good hiking stick or trekking pole(s) can be helpful.

This free hike, conducted by volunteers of the Orange Land Trust, is not at all difficult for those who are sure-footed and fit and presents an opportunity to reconnect with our town’s history and beauty. All are welcome and please bring a friend.

So, grab your hiking gear and plan to join us! Only steady rain showers will cancel.

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Guided Hike: Early Orange History and Present-Day Natural Beauty Saturday Morning

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Nov 012013
 

Hike in the woodsThe Orange Land Trust will be leading a guided hike at the Howard Brooks’ Wepawaug Conservation area on Saturday, Nov. 2. Hikers should meet at 9:30 a.m. at the parking lot on Mapledale Road (across from Cherry Hill Road). GPS location coordinates in decimal degrees: 41.2943 / 73.0302.

This moderate to challenging hike will include information on the historical highlights of the area, a view of an old mill foundation and flume cut through solid rock, and a walk through the Wepawaug Ravine. The area has great beauty, that is very visible at this time of year with the reduced foliage, and a rich history of early Orange water-powered industry. Here, we can still see the remains of a mill that, at one time, made fabric for union soldier’s uniforms during the Civil War.

If you have visited the grist-mill and saw-mill at Sturbridge, Massachusetts, you can easily imagine how this area looked with several mills in operation along the river, from the early settlement days of the seventeenth century to the turn of the twentieth. Interestingly, the Alling Tavern, where the mill workers often ate their meals, is still standing across Route 34 at Mapledale Road. Can you think of the aroma of fresh baked, wholegrain bread and beef stew at lunchtime on a gray and chilly autumn afternoon? What a welcome for travelers arriving and those workers as they crossed the Derby Turnpike toll road and approached the door ready for a mid-day meal.

Now, with the leaves mostly fallen, we can see more of the landscape within the area, and with the rainy weather of fall, the natural rock-walled ravine should be a sight to be seen with plenty of water flowing through.

In addition, we will look over the remains of a 20 foot stone chimney and learn the folksy story of a depression-era structure known as “Jim Neal’s cabin”.

Please wear appropriate footwear as there are some rocky areas and some “ups and downs” in the trail. We recommend hiking boots/shoes or shoes/sneakers with a good tread. A good hiking stick or trekking pole(s) can be helpful.

This free hike, conducted by volunteers of the Orange Land Trust, is not at all difficult for those who are sure-footed and presents an opportunity to reconnect with our town’s history and beauty. All are welcome and please bring a friend.

So, bake some bread, get the ingredients for your favorite stew simmering in the crock-pot and plan to join us! Only steady rain showers will cancel.

For information, call Chris at 203-397-7599.

Originally Published on: Oct 29, 2013 @ 12:12