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Will We Be Able To See This Month’s Full Moon?

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Aug 012020
 

The Old Farmer’s Almanac shares this information about this weekend’s full moon.

August’s full moon, known as the Full Sturgeon Moon will appear on Sunday night, August 2, before reaching peak illumination at 11:59 a.m. on Monday, August 3. On either of these nights, look toward the southeast after sunset to catch a glimpse of the Sturgeon Moon rising, that is, unless it’s overcast or raining.

This month’s full moon was traditionally called the Sturgeon Moon because the giant sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this part of summer.

Other names for this Full Moon include ”Full Green Corn Moon,” signaling that the corn was nearly ready for harvest, “Wheat Cut Moon,” “Moon When All Things Ripen,” and ”Blueberry Moon.”

Perseid Meteor Shower

Not too long after August’s Full Moon, it will be time to keep an eye out for the annual Perseid meteor shower, which lasts from late July to late August. The meteors will reach their maximum in the hours just before dawn (while it’s still dark) between August 11 and 13! Thankfully, the Moon will be in its Last Quarter phase at this time, so the meteors shouldn’t be too washed out to view. Read more about the Perseid meteor shower here.

 

The Full Sturgeon Moon Rises on Sunday

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Aug 252018
 

The Full Sturgeon Moon will officially become full on Sunday, Aug. 26 at 7:56 a.m. after moonset.

According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, the fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

While you’re moon gazing at night, check out Mercury, which is at its highest in the predawn sky and its farthest from the sun, making it an ideal time to see the innermost planet. Click this link to learn about The Brightest Planets in August’s Night Sky: How to See Them (and When)