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How Do I Make Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs?

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Mar 312021
 

 hard-boiled-eggsI learned how to make hard-boiled eggs from my mom who had to make enough every year to satisfy her three kids’ creative desires at Easter time,

You need to hard boil the eggs to the perfect texture so they don’t crack while they are boiling and are easy to peel when you are ready to eat them.

My granddaughter loves these!

Let’s get started:

Put your eggs in a single layer in a large saucepan, and cover them with an inch or two of cold water. Starting with cold water and gently bringing the eggs to a boil will help keep them from cracking. Add a tablespoon of vinegar and a half teaspoon of salt to the water. Put the burner on high and bring the eggs to a boil. As soon as the water starts to boil, remove the pan from the heat for a few seconds.

Turn the heat down to low and return the pan to the burner. Let simmer for one minute.

After a minute, remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let sit for 12 minutes.

Depending on the number of eggs you’ve made, you can check one egg to see how it’s done. Remove from the pan, run under cold water, and peel if it’s to your liking, rinse the other eggs under cold water, let them sit in the cold water for a while, then remove them and let them dry any way you prefer, on paper towels on a cake rack (whatever). When they are dry and cool you can get to work coloring them.

Store in the refrigerator in a ziplock bag or covered bowl to keep the egg smell from your fridge.

How To Cook The Perfect Hard Boiled Egg

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Mar 312015
 

Photo from popfi.com

Photo from popfi.com

It’s almost Easter. You’re a new mom, ready to color Easter eggs with your children but, you’re just not sure how long to boil the eggs so they’re perfect and not cracked or green inside.

Here’s a method that people swear will give you perfect hard-boiled eggs every time

1. Arrange the cold eggs in a single layer in a large pot and cover with water.

2. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat and cook for just 1 (one) minute.

3. Immediately turn off the heat and let the eggs stand. How long is your choice: 12 minutes will give you golden orange yolks, 15 minutes produces a moist yellow yolk.

5. Cover with ice water and let stand until you’re ready to color them — if they’re hot the kids won’t be able to handle them.

Most Asked Question At Easter: How Do I Make Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs?

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Mar 292013
 

hard-boiled-eggsI learned how to make hard boiled eggs from my mom who had to make enough every year to satisfy her three kids’ creative desires at Easter time.

Although we were of Polish decent, we never make the European (Ukranian style) fancy eggs like some relatives, but the PAAS egg dyes and some uncolored wax crayons made for some pretty unusual designs.

Before you get to decorating you need to hard boil the eggs to the perfect texture so they don’t crack while they are boiling and are easy to peel when you are ready to eat them.

Let’s get started:

Put your eggs in a single layer in a large saucepan, and cover them with an inch or two of cold water. Starting with cold water and gently bringing the eggs to a boil will help keep them from cracking. Add a tablespoon of vinegar and a half teaspoon of salt to the water. Put the burner on high and bring the eggs to a boil. As soon as the water starts to boil, remove the pan from the heat for a few seconds.

Turn the head down to low and return the pan to the burner. Let simmer for one minute.

After a minute, remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let sit for 12 minutes.

Depending on the amount of eggs you’ve made, you can check one egg to see how it’s done. Remove from the pan, run under cold water and peel if it’s to your liking, rinse the other eggs under cold water, let them sit in the cold water for a while, then remove them and let them dry any way you prefer, on paper towels on a cake rack (whatever). When they are dry and cool you can get to work coloring them.

Store in the refrigerator in a ziplock bag or covered bowl to keep the egg smell from your fridge.

They will stay good for five days.

Making Hard Boiled Eggs

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Jun 302012
 

This is the time of year when cookouts begin and hard boiled eggs become an important part of many recipes: Potato Salad, Macaroni Salad, deviled eggs. Here is a favorite recipe that has been in my family for many years, follow the directions and they will be perfect every time.

photo from Google Images

How to cook perfect hard boiled eggs

  • Cook time: 12 minutes

If you want hard boiled eggs that are easy to peel, make sure they are several days old. Try to  buy your eggs 5 days in advance of boiling. (See the reference to using old eggs in Harold McGee‘s On Food and Cooking).

Hard boiling farm fresh eggs will invariably lead to eggs that are difficult to peel. If you have boiled a batch that are difficult to peel, try putting them in the refrigerator for a few days; they should be easier to peel then.

If you need to hard cook fresh eggs, and want them easy to peel, steaming the eggs works well. Even fresh eggs steamed for 20 minutes will be easy to peel.

Method

1 Put the eggs in a single layer in a saucepan, covered by at least an inch or two of cold water. Starting with cold water and gently bringing the eggs to a boil will help keep them from cracking.

Adding a tablespoon of vinegar to the water will help keep the egg whites from running out of any eggs that happen to crack while cooking, but some people find that the vinegar affects the taste. I don’t have a problem with it and I usually add a little vinegar.

Adding a half teaspoon of salt is thought to help both with the preventing of cracking and making the eggs easier to peel. Put the burner on high and bring the eggs to a boil. As soon as the water starts to boil, remove the pan from the heat for a few seconds.

2 Reduce the heat to low, return the pan to the burner. Let simmer for one minute. (Note I usually skip this step because I don’t notice the eggs boiling until they’ve been boiling for at least a minute! Also, if you are using an electric stove with a coil element, you can just turn off the heat. There is enough residual heat in the coil to keep the eggs simmering for a minute.)

3 After a minute, remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let sit for 12 minutes. If you are doing a large batch of eggs, after 10 minutes you can check for doneness by sacrificing one egg, removing it with a slotted spoon, running it under cold water, and cutting it open.

If it isn’t done, cook the other eggs a minute or two longer. The eggs should be done perfectly at 10 minutes, but sometimes, depending on the shape of the pan, the size of the eggs, the number of eggs compared to the amount of water, and how cooked you like them, it can take a few minutes more. When you find the right time that works for you given your pan, the size of eggs you usually buy, the type of stove top you have, stick with it.

I also find that it is very hard to overcook eggs using this method. I can let the eggs sit, covered, for up to 15-20 minutes without the eggs getting overcooked.

4 Either remove the eggs with a slotted spoon and place them into a bowl of ice water (this is if you have a lot of eggs) OR strain out the water from the pan, fill the pan with cold water, strain again, fill again, until the eggs cool down a bit.

Once cooled, strain the water from the eggs. Store the eggs in a covered container (eggs can release odors) in the refrigerator. They should be eaten within 5 days.