Quantcast

Lyman Orchards To Open Sunflower Maze On Saturday, July 31

 Around Town, Charity Events, Home, Latest News  Comments Off on Lyman Orchards To Open Sunflower Maze On Saturday, July 31
Jul 302021
 

Are you looking for something different to do with your children before they have to go back to school? This isn’t in Orange, but, it sure sounds like fun!

Lyman Orchards, an independently-owned family destination for more than 275 years, has announced that Saturday, July 31 is the opening day for its 2021 Sunflower Maze at 105 South Street, Middlefield, CT. (just a 40 minute drive from Orange). A three-acre area adorned with 350,000 blooming sunflowers, the maze is the only one of its kind in Connecticut. This year’s theme will center on Arthur Read, star of the popular CPTV kids’ series “Arthur.” A ribbon-cutting ceremony is scheduled for 9 a.m., with Arthur himself in attendance. 

Children like Nevaeh will benefit from the Sunflower Maze this year.

One dollar of each admission fee will be donated to support Connecticut Children’s Center for Cancer & Blood Disorders. Connecticut Children’s is dedicated to helping children like Nevaeh—an eight-year-old born with a rare genetic disorder who is doing great today, thanks to the comprehensive care she receives at Connecticut Children’s. Lyman Orchards’ Sunflower Maze has raised more than $148,000 for Connecticut’s only health system dedicated exclusively to the care of children since the maze began operations in 2006. 

“It is our utmost honor to help children and their parents in need of financial support for medical care,” states Lyman Orchards Executive Vice President John Lyman. “We look forward every year to opening our Sunflower Maze, knowing that we are providing lots of family-oriented fun, while supporting a terrific cause.”    

“We are so grateful for the generosity of the Lyman Orchards family, whose support enables our team of pediatric experts to provide the highest quality care for families throughout our community,” says David Kinahan, President, Connecticut Children’s Foundation.

Maze Facts, Cost and Location

  • More than 350,000 yellow, orange, and red sunflowers make up this year’s maze.
  • The maze is approximately 3 acres in size
  • The average time to make it through the maze is about 30 minutes
  • During your walk amidst the sunflowers you’ll see butterflies and yellow finches, with the surrounding orchard hills as a beautiful scenic backdrop.
  • Your trip through the Sunflower Maze will be educational too as you’ll learn all about Arthur Read, the star of the popular CPTV Kid’s series “Arthur”
  • The Sunflower Maze has raised over $148,000 for Connecticut Children’s.
  • It is Connecticut’s Original Sunflower Maze, now in its 15th year of operation.

The maze will be open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Admission is $10 for adults, $6 for ages 4 – 12, and free for children under 3 years.(One dollar of each admission fee will be donated to support Connecticut Children’s Center for Cancer & Blood Disorders)

The last entrance to the maze is at 4:30 p.m. For daily updates on the maze and Pick Your own, call our 24-hour hotline at 860-349-6015. Group pricing is available for companies or outings, call 860-349-6019.

 

 

August Happenings At The Library

 Around Town, Home, Latest News  Comments Off on August Happenings At The Library
Jul 292021
 

The Case Memorial Library, 176 Tyler City Road, announced the following activities in August.

Teen Take & Make Kit: Fortune Cookies
Monday, August 2

For teens in grades 7-12. Create your own fortune cookies with this take-home baking kit. Instructions and most supplies will be provided. Participants must supply 3 large egg whites, a baking sheet, measuring cups and spoons, a mixing bowl, a mixing spoon or beaters, and water. Registration will end Thursday, July 29. Kits will be available for pickup in the Library from Monday, August 2 through Saturday, August 7. Click here to register.

 

Virtual Summer Reading Finale
Saturday, August 7

For children of all ages and their families.  Using mime, comedy, and interactive stories,Robert Rivest will bring original and classic Tall Tales (with Tails) to life before your eyes.  Registration is not required!  Sponsored by the Friends of the Case Memorial Library.

 

 

Concert: Survivors Swing Band
Sunday, August 8, 2 p.m.

Remember when you listened, sang, and danced to the great old tunes of the 1920’s through the 1940’s? The Survivors Swing Band will get your toes a-tappin’ and fingers snappin’ as you revive those memories. This program will be held outside on the Library’s back lawn. Please bring your own chair, wear a mask, and maintain social distancing. In the event of rain, this event will be postponed to Sunday, August 22.
Click here to register.

Events are free and open to the public, except as noted. Please pre-register.
Phone: 203-891-2170
http://www.casememoriallibrary.org
Visit our Facebook page

New Audiobook Titles At The Library

 Around Town, Home, Latest News  Comments Off on New Audiobook Titles At The Library
Jul 292021
 

The Case Memorial Library introduced the following audiobooks to its shelves in July.

The consequences of fear / Jacqueline Winspear.

Golden girl / Elin Hilderbrand.

The good sister : a novel / Sally Hepworth.

Hour of the Witch / Chris Bohjalian.

The last bookshop in London : a novel of World War II / Madeline Martin.

The Personal Librarian [sound recording] / Marie Benedict.

The plot : a novel / Jean Hanff Korelitz.

Where the forest meets the stars : a novel / Glendy Vanderah

 

Orange Community Farmers’ Market Today

 Around Town, Home, Latest News  Comments Off on Orange Community Farmers’ Market Today
Jul 292021
 

The Town of Orange Community Farmers’ Market takes place every Thursday from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., through September 30.

There will be no market during the week of the Orange Volunteer Firemen’s Carnival.

The popular community event will take place at the Pavilion of the High Plains Community Center, 525 Orange Center Road.  Products are only the best certified and Connecticut grown; ranging from bakery products, eggs, flowers, milk, meats, soaps, plants, in-season vegetables, as well as crafts and services.

Each week there will be vendors showcasing the freshest products.  If you do not see something you want, contact the Market Master.  All visitors must abide by the State’s Guidelines to COVID19.

For information on the event, visit the OCFM website.

 

Orange Police: Resident Charged With Disorderly Conduct

 Around Town, Home, Latest News, Police & Fire, Today's Events  Comments Off on Orange Police: Resident Charged With Disorderly Conduct
Jul 282021
 

At 11:20 p.m. on Tuesday, July 27, Orange police responded to Stonehill Drive on a dispute complaint. 

The investigation revealed that Milagros DeSalle, 50, of Orange was involved in a verbal argument which turned physical when she threw an object at another person. 

Subsequently, she was taken into custody and charged with disorderly conduct. 

DeSalle was released on a promise to appear in court on July 28.

Bobcat Sightings Around Town

 Around Town, Home, Latest News, Today's Events  Comments Off on Bobcat Sightings Around Town
Jul 282021
 

Residents have reported seeing bobcats around town.

One homeowner caught this photo of one yesterday, Tuesday, July 27 at 2:10 p.m. carrying a rabbit on Taulman Road.

Bobcats, coyote, and foxes are not unusual in Orange, yet we always feel it’s important to report sightings and remind residents to keep an eye on their pets, especially small cats and dogs so they don’t become a meal for one of these hungry predators.

 

Delta Variant, Too Many Unvaccinated People, New Mask Guidelines

 Around Town, Home, Latest News, Today's Events  Comments Off on Delta Variant, Too Many Unvaccinated People, New Mask Guidelines
Jul 282021
 

Following is an article from ShareCare that clearly explains what’s going on with Covid, the Vaccine and the importance of masking:

After relaxing its guidelines about masks in May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reversed course just two months later, recommending that all people—even those who are fully vaccinated—wear masks indoors in areas with high COVID-19 transmission rates.

This is especially important for those with weakened immune systems and those who live with people at high risk for the disease, the CDC advises.

Looking ahead to the fall, the CDC also recommends that everyone in schools—from kindergarten to 12th grade—wear a mask regardless of their vaccination status.

What prompted this decision? A surge in new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths in areas with low vaccination rates due to the rise of the highly infectious Delta variant, also known as B.1.617.2.

Delta has shown a willingness to be an opportunist, said CDC director, Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH in a July 26th news briefing. New data shows that Delta behaves “uniquely different from past strains of COVID,” Dr. Walensky explained, noting that in some rare occasions, some vaccinated people infected with Delta after vaccination may be contagious and spread the virus to others.

“Vaccinating more Americans now is more urgent than ever,” Walensky advises.

Delta on the rise
Unvaccinated people are at greatest risk of spreading the disease and passing the infection to others. Breakthrough infections among vaccinated people are rare, and if vaccinated people are infected, they’re unlikely to become seriously ill. But based on the latest available evidence, the CDC cautions that some vaccinated people who become infected with the Delta variant could potentially pose a risk to those who are not vaccinated, the CDC pointed out.

It’s estimated that Delta could be roughly twice as infectious as initial COVID strains. Some evidence also suggests Delta is more dangerous. The Delta variant is so infectious that the U.S. will need to vaccinate a higher percentage of people in order to achieve herd immunity, according to former CDC director, Tom Frieden, MD, MPH.

Nearly 90 percent of U.S. jurisdictions have seen a surge in new COVID-19 cases as of July 22, the CDC reports. Meanwhile, 35 percent of U.S. counties are experiencing high levels of community transmission. Health officials warn that as more people become infected, healthcare resources may once again become drained, increasing the risk for worse outcomes.

Vaccination rates have stalled
As of July 25, 49 percent of eligible U.S. adults and young people age 12 or older are fully vaccinated, and nearly 57 percent are partially vaccinated with at least one dose of a COVID vaccine. But roughly 30 percent of adults who could be immunized have not gotten even one shot.

To be clear: COVID-19 is now among the list of preventable diseases—along with others, like polio, measles and Chickenpox (Varicella), according to the CDC. But pockets of unvaccinated people across the United States and around world are providing opportunities for the virus to continue mutating, possibly rendering existing vaccines less effective against it.

In fact, variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are responsible for every single new case in the United States, the CDC reports. The original coronavirus strain is no longer among the variants spreading across the country. The Delta variant now represents 83 percent of new COVID-19 cases in the United States, according to Walensky.

What hasn’t changed
The decision to rollback mask rules based on CDC guidance will be made and implemented by state and local officials.

But face coverings are still required by federal, state or local laws or where mandated by tribal or territorial laws and regulations, the CDC notes.  Masks also remain required in healthcare settings, jails and homeless shelters.

Everyone—even those who are fully vaccinated—must continue to wear a mask on all planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation when traveling into, within, or out of the United States. Masks must also be worn in U.S. airports, stations and other transportation hubs.

Masks may also still be required by certain businesses and workplaces.

Be part of the solution
All people can help prevent the coronavirus from mutating by taking all possible steps to prevent its spread, including getting immunized if you’re eligible to receive a vaccine, wearing a mask indoors in areas with high transmission rates and washing your hands well and often and not touching your face with unclean hands.

Other preventative steps you can take:

  • Practice social distancing. That means stay at least 6 feet apart from other people.
  • Avoid crowded places, close-contact settings, and confined and enclosed spaces with poor ventilation.
  • Do not linger indoors around other people.
  • When indoors, increase circulation of outdoor air as much as possible. This includes opening windows, doors and turning on fans and keeping the air moving when you’re inside.
  • Avoid buildings with poor ventilation.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol (if soap and water aren’t available).
  • Stay home from work or school if you are sick or have symptoms.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with tissues that you then put in the trash.
  • Frequently disinfect surfaces with cleaning spray or wipes.

Medically reviewed in July 2021.

 

Sharecare is a great resource for current medical issues.

Republican Caucus: Party Reveals 2021 Municipal Election Slate

 Latest News  Comments Off on Republican Caucus: Party Reveals 2021 Municipal Election Slate
Jul 272021
 

First Selectman Jim Zeoli, 61, has led the town of Orange for 16 years, and this year, he will seek re-election as he feels he still has so much more to offer.

Tonight, Tuesday, July 27, the Orange Republican Party hosted its caucus and announced the slate for the 2021 municipal election.

2021 Orange Republican Municipal Candidates

First Selectman Jim Zeoli

Board of Selectmen John Carangelo, Judy Wright Williams, Ralph Okenquist

Town Clerk Mary Shaw

Tax Collector Thomas Hurley

Board of Finance Joseph Nuzzo, Ajeet Jain

Orange BOE Jeffery Cap, Ronnette James, Tatiana Messina Mullen

P&Z (Full Term) Ozzie Parente, Kevin Cornell

P&Z (2 years) Tom Torrenti

Constables Jody Daymon, Michael Donadeo, Glenn Papelo, Dan Zapatka

Amity BOE Christina Levere Daddio, Sean Hartshorn

Q & A With Orange’s Pat Winkel, Twins Baseball Draft Pick

 Around Town, Home, Latest News, Sports  Comments Off on Q & A With Orange’s Pat Winkel, Twins Baseball Draft Pick
Jul 262021
 

If you are from the Amity area, you know the name Pat Winkel. If you are lucky enough to have met him, you know how genuine, polite and smart he is.

With the Amity Spartans

If you’ve been fortunate enough to have seen him play baseball locally, from the time he was a child playing in Orange Little League, then later on the American Legion team, and finally at Amity High School where he was named Athlete of the Year in 2018 then you have seen the joy on his face when he’s on the field. This young man genuinely loves the game.

While in high school, Pat made headlines as the 31st round pick by the New York Yankees in the 2018 MLB Draft. He chose to study at UCONN and play baseball with his big brother, Chris, instead.

Earlier this month, he was picked in the 9th round by the Minnesota Twins.

Last week Orange Live talked to Pat to catch up, congratulate him and to get the answers to those questions that may have been bopping around your heads.

Here’s our conversation:

OL: How does it feel to be drafted again? 

From UConn Website

It feels unbelievable, especially with the draft being shorter, and less kids being picked, its even more of an honor now than it was back then. I’m finally able to start that chapter in my life and it feels even better.

OL: Out of High School you chose your further education and playing college ball with your brother over the Yankees, how is this time different?

I think I’m more ready. I used that time at UConn to learn about myself more – to learn about my game a little bit more and hone in on those things that I’m good at, and fix some things that I wasn’t “amazing” at to become a better player. 

OL: Did you expect your name to come up sooner or later?

At the end of the day I’m just really happy that it worked out for me. It’s not really about where, it’s about the opportunity and that’s an important way to look at it. It’s great to say that you were in this round pick or that one, but really it’s all about getting the opportunity and getting a chance to come here and start that pro career that people always dream about. For me, just getting the call and hearing my name — it was awesome.

OL: Were you happy that it was the Twins who chose you?

I’m happy the Twins took me, it’s a great organization. I was surprised because it happened really quick from the time I found out they were considering me to when they took me was all in a couple of minutes. It happened really fast.

OL: Where are you now?

I’m in Fort Myers, Florida at their baseball academy which is their spring training complex and we’re doing physicals and acclamation and [other] work over the next so many days.

OL: The Twins have 6 farm teams — Are you going somewhere else or are you going to be based in Florida?

I’m not quite sure, yet. I’m down here for what’s called a mini-camp and then after the mini-camp I’m assuming the players that are drafted will be placed on different teams, but I’m not sure yet.

UCONN

OL: How many catchers do the Twins have in their farm teams? What kind of competition do you have?

I’m not really sure. I know they took another great catcher that I met through college and this summer when I was at Cape Cod. He’s a great player. I’m not sure how many they have in the farm system but obviously everyone here is a professional and everyone is here for a reason so I’m sure, but the competition is going to be very tough. 

OL: How many steps away from major leagues are you now?

Well, I’m here now and then there are four or five teams prior to the majors, depending on where you get placed. The goal is to just keep playing well and going up the system.

OL: How did our local Orange little league, American Legion and Amity High School prepare you for this moment in your life?

They are all so intertwined. Not only Orange but the Woodbridge and Bethany (Amity) system puts such an emphasis on not only sports but also making good quality people too. The coaches we’ve had preach on you being a good person on and and off the field and tell you how to have a good character, so just going through that system and the little league system really gives you the tools to be able to go to that next level. So whether it was going from little league to middle school and middle school to high school, then college it just made the transitions seamless.

OL: When did you first take on the position of catcher?

I first became a catcher in little league. So, I’ve been catching for 13 or 14 years and I haven’t had any problems (knee injuries) with it, and that’s the goal to just stay healthy. I knew pretty early that that’s what I wanted to do, and that’s when I became serious about it. I think that benefitted me to take all of those years and hone in on one thing versus trying different positions and figuring out that I didn’t want to play shortstop or be a pitcher.

OL: How are your friends and fans reacting to the latest news?

Oh, it’s great, I’ve gotten so much support from all my friends, kids that I knew in high school who I haven’t talked to in a long time because we went to different schools, or they’ve been busy. But there have been a ton of people reaching out saying congrats and wishing me the best. It’s great hearing from people from Amity and even middle school and grammar school that I haven’t heard from in a bit.

My coaches were some of the first ones to call me. (Bob Mirto from Legion ball and Amity Coach Sal Coppola) They’re the greatest. They always wish the guys the best. I always have them to talk to, they’re always checking in. Those are great relationships that will never die.They are lifelong friends, quality coaches that only want the best for their players.

OL: Do you have any advice for kids in the early stages of baseball (little league, etc) to get to where you are.

Yes. At the end of the day, it is a game, especially in little league that’s the time when you want to enjoy it the most. You should really have fun and don’t put too much pressure on yourself, because it’s hard to play when there’s too much pressure on you, and you may not play well. So remember it’s a game, enjoy it the best you can and good things will happen.

OL: You were always known for wearing bowties when you dressed up, can we expect to see that signature look in the future?

Absolutely you can. That’s going nowhere.

 

Orange Live thanks Pat for taking the time to chat with us and of course, we wish him the very best in the future. 

It’s Happening At The Library

 Around Town, Home, Latest News, Today's Events  Comments Off on It’s Happening At The Library
Jul 252021
 

The Case Memorial Library, 176 Tyler City Road, offers the following:

Virtual Author Talk: Found in Transition

Monday, July 26, 7 p.m.
In this autobiographical narrative, an Iranian-American pediatrician and mother of three is blindsided when one of her children comes out as transgender. As the author grapples with her child’s transition from male to female, she is forced to re-examine her ideas of parenting, gender, and personal identity.  Join us for a Zoom talk with author Paria Hassouri!
Click here to register.

Teen Take & Make Kit: Fortune Cookies
Monday, August 2
For teens in grades 7-12. Create your own fortune cookies with this take-home baking kit. Instructions and most supplies will be provided. Participants must supply 3 large egg whites, a baking sheet, measuring cups and spoons, a mixing bowl, a mixing spoon or beaters, and water. Registration will end Thursday, July 29. Kits will be available for pickup in the Library from Monday, August 2 through Saturday, August 7.
Click here to register.

Virtual Summer Reading Finale
Saturday, August 7
For children of all ages and their families.  Using mime, comedy, and interactive stories, Robert Rivest will bring original and classic Tall Tales (with Tails) to life before your eyes.  Registration is not required!  Sponsored by the Friends of the Case Memorial Library.

Events are free and open to the public, except as noted.

Please pre-register.

Phone: 203-891-2170
http://www.casememoriallibrary.org
Visit our Facebook page